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That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

That night in Toronto…

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer…

The story of Bill Barilko was well-known to hockey fans a half-century ago. But, it wasn’t until 41 years after his heroic goal and disappearance that his strange tale was reintroduced to the mainstream by one of Canada’s all-time great bands. The Tragically Hip’s ’50 Mission Cap’ succinctly recounts the summer of 1951 in the song’s verse.

Bill Barilko disappeared that summer

He was on a fishing trip

The last goal he ever scored

Won the Leafs the cup

They didn’t win another till nineteen sixty two

The year he was discovered

Given that the song sheds light on the strange coincidence/cosmic fate of the Maple Leafs’ Stanley Cup fortunes and Barilko’s disappearance, it seems additionally fitting that the song — from The Hip’s fourth album, Fully Completely — was released in 1992, the year Barilko’s number was formally hoisted to the rafters by the hockey club.

Since that release, The Tragically Hip and Bill Barilko have been tightly woven together in their corner of hockey lore. One of the band’s most popular and recognizable songs coupled with one of hockey’s most unique and unlikely stories.

The bond between the two was cemented in 2001 as the Maple Leafs got set to drop the puck on their second round playoff series.

On May 1 — 50 years and 10 days after the Leafs captured the 1951 Stanley Cup on Barilko’s OT winner — the Maple Leafs held a pre-game ceremony to honour Barilko.

Present at the ceremony were Anne Klisanich (Barilko’s last survivng sibling), eight members of the 1951 Stanley Cup Champion Maple Leafs (Gus Mortson, Harry Watson, Danny Lewicki, John McCormack, Bob Hassard, Fleming Mackell, Sid Smith and Cal Gardner) and The Tragically Hip.

The ceremony began with a tribute to Barilko’s banner above the Air Canada Centre ice. Afterwards, The Tragically Hip presented Klisanich with the hand-written lyrics to the song “50 Mission Cap” and the hockey card referenced in the song. The Maple Leafs were also presented with a copy of the handwritten lyrics to the song.

The lyrics were immediately put up in the club’s dressing room. They remain the only unchanged item in the room since 2001.

In addition to their status as the pride of Kingston, Ont., there is no denying band’s standing in Toronto. At Air Canada Centre alone, the band has played 13 shows. Among those 13 are the first in the building’s history and a show on December 31, 1999 that welcomed a new millenium on the Air Canada Centre stage.

More recently, they’ve been recognized as an Air Canada Centre ICON for “outstanding achievement and ongoing contribution to Air Canada Centre and Toronto as a global leader in live entertainment.”

On August 10, 2016 — officially The Tragically Hip Day in Toronto following a proclamation from Mayor John Tory — we get set for the first of three shows in Toronto. They are potentially the last three played by the band in the city.

For the band’s immense local fanbase, “That night in Toronto” is more than a lyric from ‘Bobcaygeon’ — another Hip classic named for a town where Leafs alumni Allan Stanley, Johnny Bower and Bob Goldham spent considerable time in their post-hockey lives

“That night in Toronto” is the starting point for a story from one of many memories and many nights in Toronto. Many nights that have spanned a 30-plus year career at the forefront of Canadian music. A career that has captivated crowds at Maple Leaf Gardens, Air Canada Centre and venues across the city. A career that has physically imprinted the band on Toronto’s streets as part of Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Ask someone on a street corner if they have a Hip story and the odds are good they’ll deliver. If you’re reading this, you may have your own. Come on down to Air Canada Centre and you can deliver it on video.

Whether a Hip singalong at a cottage, making the two-hour trek to Bobcaygeon with 25,000 other fans to see the band perform in the setting of the eponymous song five years ago or simply taking the time to learn more about Bill Barilko after listening to ’50 Mission Cap’, everyone has a story.

Every time Torontonians were asked to wait and see, tomorrow brought The Tragically Hip back to town. With the imprint they’ve left, it’s hard to distinguish times they’ve ever left.

So, as Toronto celebrates The Tragically Hip, here’s to those nights in Toronto, that May 1st night in Toronto, tonight in Toronto and many more to come.

Until the next one, the lyrics to “50 Mission Cap” — alongside a hockey card — will hang on the wall of the Maple Leafs dressing room, unchanged. A small, handwritten reminder of a pair of immense Canadian legacies.

Source: That night in Toronto…

NHL.com: Reasons for optimism; Questions facing the Maple Leafs

From Official Toronto Maple Leafs

The Toronto Maple Leafs have resisted the temptation of a quick fix over the past few years. Unlike previous regimes that promised to be patient and then jumped the gun by making a big trade that cost them youth and draft picks, president Brendan Shanahan and general manager Lou Lamoriello continue to build through the draft.

If Toronto remains on that path, homegrown talent will ultimately form the nucleus of the Maple Leafs when they make the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

Here are four reasons for optimism entering this season:

1. Brendan Shanahan’s in charge

The future of the Maple Leafs is directly tied to Shanahan’s vision. A strong personality, Shanahan was not intimidated by bringing other powerful voices into the mix, including coach Mike Babcock and Lamoriello. Shanahan is a proven winner, as are his coach and GM. Lamoriello said his initial goal was to bridge the gap between entitlement and responsibility on and off the ice. He may be old-fashioned in his handling of players, but discipline was needed and Shanahan knew Lamoriello was the man for the job.

2. Mike Babcock’s strong voice

The Maple Leafs paid a premium to get the man they considered to be the best coach in the world. Toronto finished 30th in the NHL in Babcock’s first season, but there was a noticeable improvement in play and discipline. Babcock is very rigid in how he wants his players to perform, and that can grate on the nerves of veterans. However, with Toronto predominantly a young team, the coach has a captive audience. Babcock has very high expectations of his players, and those who do not toe the line will not be tolerated. There is a reason Babcock has been invited to coach Team Canada for the World Cup of Hockey 2016 and why he was behind the bench for the past two Olympic gold medal teams: He gets the most out of his players.

3. Frederik Andersen is the No. 1 goaltender

Coming off a season when he shared the William M. Jennings Trophy for allowing the fewest number of goals (with Anaheim Ducks teammate John Gibson), the Maple Leafs believe Andersen is the answer to their goaltending concerns. They were so convinced of that, they traded the No. 30 pick in the 2016 NHL Draft to acquire him from the Ducks.

Andersen (6-foot-4, 220 pounds), who will be 27 when the season begins, is entering the prime of his career and will be given every opportunity in Toronto. He began last season 0-6-1 when the Ducks struggled but wound up 22-9-7.

If the Maple Leafs continue to improve defensively, Andersen will be a big part.

4. Patience is paying off

For years it was said Maple Leafs fans would never put up with a tear-down and rebuild. Nothing could be further from the truth. Leafs Nation has grown frustrated with quick fixes that simply did not work.

Shanahan and his group have made it very clear to the fans they will not do that. Fans watched patiently last season when prospects were inserted into the lineup and gave them a glimpse of the future. Perhaps not all the young players will make the Maple Leafs, but there were enough quality performances to conclude the organization is moving in the right direction.

Here are three key questions facing the Maple Leafs:

1. How soon can the young nucleus contribute?

Forwards Auston Matthews, William Nylander and Mitchell Marner have been projected to be elite scorers in the League. How quickly they become impact players will play a huge role in how quickly the Maple Leafs return to the playoffs. Matthews will likely get the chance to be the No. 1 center, and centers Nylander and Marner could start off playing wing. The Maple Leafs ranked 28th in goals last season (192) and could use a boost on offense. Forward Josh Leivo, on the bubble to make the team after signing a two-year contract, had five goals in 12 games last season. Veteran left wing James van Riemsdyk will make a healthy return after missing 42 games with a broken foot.

2. Can Frederik Andersen give the Maple Leafs a minimum of 60 games?

Andersen split the workload with Gibson in Anaheim last season, when most of the best goalies in the NHL were playing 60 or more games. Braden Holtby, winner of the Vezina Trophy as the League’s best goalie, played 66 games for the Washington Capitals. That will be the expectation for Andersen this season. In three NHL seasons, Andersen has appeared in 28, 54 and 43 games. Playing behind Babcock’s defensive system, a minimum of 60 games should be doable.

3. Will a leader emerge?

Toronto did not anoint a new captain after Dion Phaneuf was traded to the Ottawa Senators on Feb. 9. There has been some sentiment that fourth-year defenseman Morgan Rielly would be a suitable replacement, but he is 22 years old and the Maple Leafs don’t seem eager to give the role to such a young player. It could be they will wait for Matthews to establish himself and then name him captain, in the way the Edmonton Oilers seem to be waiting for Connor McDavid to grow into that role.

Source: NHL.com: Reasons for optimism; Questions facing the Maple Leafs